The objectives of the educational programs are the promotion of animal welfare through the teaching of ethics and best practices for animal experimentation, and the protection of the health and safety of individuals who care for and use research animals.

MODULE I TRAINING

To ensure that personnel conducting procedures on research animals are appropriately qualified and trained in those procedures required training is assigned by the IACUC and must be completed before the protocol / amendment can be approved. Module 1 training is MANDATORY for EVERY research animal user. This is in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations and guidelines.

For additional information please see IACUC Policy 200: Education and Training for the Humane Care and Use of Animals in Research, Training, and Testing.

Module I - Training and Examination

 

MODULE II TRAINING

The second Module in the Cornell training program is Module II "Animal Facility Tours". Staff and investigators will be required to complete Module II for each respective facility that they will be entering and working in. This training will be given by the facility manager, supervisor, or their designated trainer.

For information on Module II; please read the Module II Training SOP.

Complete one of these forms for each person entering and working in each facility

  • Module II Form for New Employees - Coming Soon
  • Module II Form for Established Employees - Coming Soon

 

MODULE III TRAINING: INTRO TO RODENTS: (HANDS ON)

Course Overview:

This course uses a combination of didactic and hands-on instruction to guide trainees to competency in handling small rodents. Using the mouse as the focal species, course content includes understanding normal and abnormal rodent behavior and signs of illness. Demonstration and practice of a variety of handling and restraint techniques are taught using inanimate training tools, followed by live animal practice. Instructors also implement compassionate delivery of the principles, precautions, and practice of humane euthanasia. Students will be instructed on handling rodents as humanely as possible, while ensuring the safety of the animals and themselves. Total anticipated class time: 2 hours

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is required for individuals who work with rodents on the Cornell University campus and must be completed prior to participating in any work that requires contact with rodents.

Exemptions from this training may be granted to individuals who can demonstrate previous comparable training or experience. Please contact the CARE Training Team (caretraining@cornell.edu) to request an exemption; be prepared to have proof of prior training.

Prerequisites (Online):

  • Module 1 – Introduction to the Care and Use of Animals for Research, Teaching and Testing
  • Working with the Laboratory Mouse (or rat, depending on which species you are working with)
  • Laboratory Animal Allergy

All on-line modules are located on the AALAS Learning Library (ALL). To access these modules:

  • Click on this link: https://researchservices.cornell.edu/training/iacuc-education-and-training
  • Click on “Access Online Training”.
  • Sign in using your Cornell NetID and password as directed.
  • Click on “Tracks” on the left side of the ALL home screen.
  • Scroll to and click on “Mouse Track with Non-survival Surgery or No Surgery”.
  • Complete all modules in this track, including their final exams, to receive credit for the courses.

 

WEBSITE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MODULE IV TRAINING

Module IV consists of several hands-on training classes beyond the basic handling courses, including Advanced Techniques (training for procedures such as various injection and blood collection techniques, oral gavage) and the Surgical Training Course. See individual course descriptions for further details and sign-up information.

Module IV: Advanced Techniques (Hands On)

These classes on advanced techniques are conducted using a combination of didactic and hands-on techniques that are not covered in Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-On). Using inanimate training tools, animal surrogates, and live animals, students will be taught the skills needed to perform procedures required to collect the physiological data required for their protocols.

To sign up for any of the Advanced Technique training classes, please contact the CARE Training Team (caretraining@cornell.edu).

Module IV: Injection Training - Subcutaneous, Intraperitoneal, Tail Vein, Retroorbital, Intracardiac

Course Overview:

This class teaches the principles and concepts of performing injections on mice (or other rodents).

Topics Covered:

Safe and proper selection and handling of needles and syringes, proper animal restraint for the procedure, anatomical landmarks, recommended volumes, safe and humane application of the procedure on a live animal model, and record keeping. Total anticipated class time: 1-2 hours (dependent upon competency handling and restraining rodents demonstrated in Module I)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is strongly recommended for ANY personnel who will be performing injections on rodents, small mammals, and birds.

Prerequisites:

  • All online modules required for Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • The ability to handle and restrain mice competently and confidently.

Module IV: Blood Collection Training – Submandibular, Tail Vein, Lateral Saphenous, Retroorbital, Cardiac

Course Overview:

This class teaches the principles and concepts of performing blood collection on mice (or other rodents).

Topics Covered:

Safe and proper selection and handling of needles, lancets and syringes, proper animal restraint for the procedure, anatomical landmarks, recommended volumes, anesthesia (depending on procedure), safe and humane application of the procedure on a live animal model and record keeping. Total anticipated class time: 1-2 hours (dependent upon level of competency handling and restraining rodents)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is strongly recommended for ANY personnel performing survival blood collection on rodents, small mammals, and birds.

Prerequisites:

  • All online modules required for Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • The ability to handle and restrain mice competently and confidently.

Module IV: Cervical Dislocation – Mice, Small Rodents, and Birds

Course Overview:

This class teaches the principles and technique for performing cervical dislocation.

Topics Covered:

Anatomical landmarks, and proper restraint and positioning using inanimate training tools and animal cadavers. Total anticipated class time: 30 minutes (assuming competency handling and restraining rodents)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is recommended for individuals who will be performing cervical dislocation as a method of euthanasia with anesthesia or as a secondary method of euthanasia as listed on their protocol. This course is REQUIRED for individuals who will be performing cervical dislocation without anesthesia as a method of euthanasia on their protocol.

Prerequisites for Mouse Users:

  • All online modules required for Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • The ability to handle and restrain rodents competently and confidently.

Module IV: Oral Gavage – Mice, Rats, and Small Rodents

Course Overview:

This class teaches the principles and technique for performing the oral administration of a medication/feed directly into the stomach via a gavage needle. Students will first learn and practice on an inanimate training tool before performing the procedure on a live animal model.

Topics Covered:

Proper handling and restraint, determining correct needle size, positioning of the mouse, application of the procedure, troubleshooting and record keeping. Total anticipated class time: 30 minutes – 1 hour (assuming competency handling and restraining rodents)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is REQUIRED for individuals who will be performing oral gavage on rodents and small birds.

Prerequisites for Mouse Users:

  • All online modules required for Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • Module III: Intro to Rodents (Hands-on)
  • The ability to handle and restrain rodents competently and confidently.

Module IV: Overview of Surgical Training Course (3 Classes)

Surgical training is conducted using a combination of didactic and hands-on techniques. A three-part series of surgical training has been designed to teach surgical principles and skills using inanimate training tools to build dexterity and manipulations that will later be applied to surgical practice on animals.

Advanced Techniques Training Diagram

To sign up for any of the Advanced Techniques training classes, please contact the CARE Training Team (caretraining@cornell.edu).

Module IV - Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, PART 1 – Basic Principles and Surgical Instrument Handling

Course Overview:

This class is the first installment of a three-part series. The focus is on teaching the basics concepts of aseptic surgical technique.

Topics Covered:

Regulations pertaining to rodent surgery, proper planning, aseptic technique practices, post-surgical care, record keeping, and safety considerations. Sharps safety and introduction to scalpel handling will also be taught. Hands-on topics include instrument identification and selection, instrument handling, and manipulations using a variety of dexterity tools and exercises. Total anticipated class time: 3.5 hours

Who Should Take This Course?

The course is strongly recommended for personnel performing survival surgery on rodents, small mammals, and birds.

Prerequisites (Online):

  • Module I: Introduction to the Care and Use of Animals for Research, Teaching and Testing
  • Working with the Laboratory Mouse (or Rat, depending on which specie you’re working with)
  • Laboratory Animal Allergy
  • Aseptic Technique for Rodent Survival Surgery
  • Post-procedure Care of Mice and Rats in Research: Minimizing Pain and Distress

All on-line modules are located on the AALAS Learning Library (ALL). To access these modules:

  • Click on this link: https://researchservices.cornell.edu/training/iacuc-education-and-training
  • Click on “Access Online Training”.
  • Sign in using your Cornell NetID and password as directed.
  • Click on “Tracks” on the left side of the ALL home screen.
  • Scroll to and click on “Mouse Track with Survival Surgery”.
  • Complete all modules in this track, including their final exams, to receive credit for the courses.

Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, PART 2 – Scalpel Safety and Handling and Suturing Skills

Course Overview:

This is the second installment of a three-part series focused on teaching the basic concepts of aseptic surgical technique.

Topics Covered:

Scalpel handling and safety, incision practice, suture material and uses, knot tying, and suturing exercises. Total anticipated class time: 2 hours (If deemed by the CARE training team to be competent and practiced on skills learned in PART 1)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is strongly recommended for personnel performing survival surgery on rodents, small mammals, and birds. The class offers an opportunity to build upon and apply the skills learned in Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, Part 1. Participation is encouraged even if suture skills are not required by an individual as this course provides an opportunity to further development of fine motor skills and practice manipulating surgical instruments.

Prerequisites:

  • All online modules required for Part 1 (see Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, Part 1)
  • Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, Part 1

Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, PART 3 – Practicing Aseptic Technique

Course Overview:

This course is the third and final installment of a three-part series focused on teaching the basic concepts of aseptic surgical technique. The course serves as a culmination of PARTS 1 and 2. Before attending the module, students will be asked to prepare a surgical plan and a checklist of surgical supplies and procedures. Students will then prepare and set up a sterile surgical field, prepare their surgical surrogate (using an inanimate training tool), scrub and gown, perform a mock surgery with a two-layer incision and closure, recover the patient and complete surgical records. Total anticipated class time: 3 hours (If deemed by the CARE training team to be competent and practiced on skills learned in PARTS 1 and 2)

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is strongly recommended for ANY personnel performing survival surgery on rodents, small mammals, and birds.

Prerequisites:

  • All online modules required for Part 1 (see Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, Part 1)
  • Module IV: Principles of Aseptic Rodent Surgery, Parts 1 and 2

 

Laboratory Animal Medicine Residency

The objective of this residency program is to train graduate veterinarians for a career in laboratory animal medicine, research, and service, by providing them with the knowledge and experience necessary to achieve certification by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM).

For more information please visit the Laboratory Animal Medicine Residency web page.

 

3 Ts: TRANSLATIONAL TRAINING TOOLS

For more information please visit the Translational Training Tools web page.

 

 

ASLAP SUMMER FELLOWSHIP IN LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

For more information please visit the ASLAP Summer Fellowship in Medicine web page.