IRB Guidance and Resources

Cornell IRB guidance and policies, and links to external sources to help you plan, obtain, and maintain IRB approval for your project

UPDATED September 7, 2022

COVID-19: Cornell IRB COVID-19 guidance and FAQs have been updated (Sept. 7, 2022). Face masks are still required for in-person, on-campus human participant research activities similar to clinical exams or procedures. Review the revised guidance in its entirety here.

TRAINING UPDATE: Effective October 1, 2022, all Cornell study personnel involved in Exempt research protocols will be required to complete CITI training in human participant research ethics. See details here. For more information about Cornell IRB training requirements, visit the IRB Training webpage.

IRB PROTOCOLS: As of February 1, 2022, we are using the RASS-IRB system for new protocol submissions, continuing reviews, amendments, and adverse event and protocol deviation reporting. See more details about the transition to RASS-IRB here. Find how-to documentation and recordings of Zoom training sessions on the RASS Guide Site. For help or feedback about the system, contact the RASS team at: rass@research.cornell.edu. For content-related questions about your IRB protocol or other human participant research topics, email irbhp@cornell.edu per usual. You can also schedule a Zoom meeting with members of the RASS or IRB teams via Microsoft Bookings.

Looking for guidance and resources? The links and documents below will help you to understand the main processes and guidelines used by the Cornell IRB, as well as external policies, regulations and best practices that might apply to your research using human participants.

Cornell IRB Guidance & Procedures

External Regulations & Guidance

Here is a list of selected laws, regulations and guidelines concerning the conduct of research with human participants:

The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (the “Common Rule”)

The Belmont Report

HIPAA Privacy Rule

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 21 CFR Regulations

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

New York State’s Article 24-A: Protection of Human Subjects

New York Civil Rights Law Section 79-l: Confidentiality of records of genetic tests