UPDATED 7/7/2020: Owing to the heightened risk of COVID-19 transmission, the Provost and Vice Provost for Research have stated that “we must reduce laboratory research and other nonessential research activities.” Therefore, although the IACUC is moving forward with reviewing and approving protocols, amendments, and renewals, these approvals do NOT supersede the Provost’s directive.

Cornell University has been cleared by the state to restart research activities in a staged, limited manner. As directed by the Provost and Vice Provost for Research, initial stages will involve research related to health and disease, agriculture/food, national defense, and research in support of other essential businesses. Before research can resume, buildings must be cleared, sufficient protective equipment must be available for all personnel, and individual lab plans must receive departmental and college approvals. Please note that only individuals whose research work requires them to be on-site should be working on campus. Please reference the Cornell Research and Operations Reactivation Committee’s guide for the safe restart of the university's research, and visit the IACUC COVID-19 FAQs page for more information.

  • Appropriate reasons to conduct research activity on campus
    • Use of scientific equipment located only on campus
    • Use of reagents
    • Research involving animals and plants
  • Inappropriate reasons to conduct research activity on campus
    • Personal preference or convenience

Thank you for taking these limitations into consideration, and please contact the IACUC if you have any questions.

The IACUC Office, CARE, and collaborating units help you initiate and manage your animal work.

Before purchasing animals or using animals for research, teaching or testing, you must have an approved IACUC protocol.
Before your protocol can be approved, you (and personnel working with you) must complete required training. Access the AALAS training website. 

Animal Care and Use Procedures and IACUC Policies and SOPs

Animal Care and Use Procedures (ACUPs) and IACUC policies are your standard operating procedures. Cornell faculty, researchers and their staff, animal facility personnel, and students must comply with these procedures.

Note: The use of animals for research, teaching, or testing is subject to Cornell Policy 1.4, Care and Use of Live Vertebrate Animals in Research and Teaching.

Health and Safety For Animal Users

Animal Users Health and Safety Program (AUHSP) helps to identify health risks for you and your staff when using animals in research, teaching or testing. All animal users are automatically enrolled in AUHSP and need to complete AUHSP requirements before access to facilities and animals is granted.

How do CARE and IACUC Work Together?

These groups work together work to ensure animal welfare, facilitate research and teaching, and provide oversight.

  • Center for Animal Resources and Education (CARE) is responsible for the care and use of all animals used in research, teaching, and testing. CARE oversees all aspects of animal well-being, including clinical care and housing.
    • As a service and resource to the Cornell research and teaching community, CARE staff provide you with high-quality veterinary care, consultations and training on animal use, including experimental design and protocol development.
    • CARE veterinarians are responsible for conducting veterinary pre-reviews of protocols. The Attending Veterinarian, or designated CARE veterinarian, is a voting member of the IACUC.
  • Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for independent oversight of the Animal Care and Use program at Cornell University, and monitoring its compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and appropriate guidelines. 
    • An IACUC is required by federal law. 
    • All research, teaching, or testing activities involving the use of vertebrate animals are reviewed and approved by the IACUC before any animals can be procured and work can begin. 
    • IACUC provides guidance to faculty, investigators, technicians, students, staff, and administrators in planning and conducting all animal use procedures with the highest scientific, humane and ethical principles.